Russia-Ukraine war: List of key events, day 138

As the Russia-Ukraine war enters its 138th day, we take a look at the main developments.

Here are the key events so far on Monday, July 11.

Get the latest updates here.

Fighting

  • Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said there had been no let-up in Russian attacks on his country, with 34 air raids conducted in the past 24 hours, including strikes that killed at least 15 people in the Donetsk town of Chasiv Yar.
  • There was no comment about the Chasiv Yar attack at a Russian defence ministry briefing on Sunday.
  • The head of Ukraine’s president’s office, Andriy Yermak, called it an act of “terrorism”, saying Russia should be on the list of “state terrorist sponsors”.
  • Ukraine’s army has trapped Russian forces in the area of the village of Bilohorivka, about 50km (30 miles) east of Sloviansk, from where they are shelling the surrounding settlements and carrying out air attacks, Luhansk Governor Serhiy Haidai said.
  • Ukrainian officials, meanwhile, urged civilians in the Russian-occupied southern region of Kherson to evacuate as Ukraine’s armed forces were preparing a counterattack there.

Diplomacy

  • Ukraine’s defence minister said Western-donated high mobility artillery rocket systems (HIMARS) were making a “huge” difference on the battlefield after a senior United States official said the Biden administration would be sending four more HIMARS as part of a $400m weapons package.
  • US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said he had discussed Russia’s invasion of Ukraine with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi and raised concerns about Beijing’s alignment with Moscow.
  • Russia’s foreign ministry spokeswoman characterised United Kingdom Foreign Secretary Liz Truss’s early departure from Bali, before last week’s G20 meeting, as a “deep boycott” of the Russian delegation, state news agency TASS reported.

Economy

  • The Nord Stream 1 pipeline carrying Russian gas to Germany starts annual maintenance on Monday, with flows expected to stop for 10 days, but governments, markets and companies are worried Moscow might extend the shutdown.
  • Siemens said Canada’s decision to allow a turbine to be sent from its repair shop in Canada to Germany was a necessary first step towards returning it to the Russian pipeline it operates, and that it was aiming to get it there as soon as possible.
  • The French government is preparing to totally cut off Russian gas supplies, which it sees as the most likely scenario in its forward planning.

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